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Do you see the girl rotating clockwise or counterclockwise

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At first glance, the spinning dancer looks just like an ordinary image of a woman doing a pirouette. However, for most, after enough observation, the tiny figure suddenly switches the direction of her dance. The spinning dancer was created by Japanese web designer Nobuyuki Kayahara in , and since the early s, it has gained popularity as a way to determine whether or not people are right-brain creative or left-brain logical dominant. Viewers are told that if they view the dancer as standing on her left leg and spinning clockwise, then they are right-brain dominant, and if they see the reverse the dancer standing on her right leg and spinning counter-clockwise , then they are left-brain dominant.

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How Does The "Spinning Dancer" Optical Illusion Work? This Brain Trick Will Make You Dizzy

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By Stacy Liberatore For Dailymail. At first glance, it's a simple video of a dancer spinning. However, in fact it is an optical illusion that some say could actually reveal how smart you are. It plays with the brain's visual perception - some see her spinning clockwise, counterclockwise or even switching between the two.

Scroll down for videos. The optical illusion was created by the Japanese Flash designer Nobuyuki Kayahara in and for many years, was used to determine whether people are right-brain creative or left-brain logical dominant. However, recent studies reveal that it does not deal with areas of the brain, but our perspective. Most people see her spinning clockwise because we tend to choose a viewpoint from above rather than below.

Another reason for our clockwise bias is an attentional bias that leans towards the right side of the body. There is also a trick to see her switch between directions. Stay focused on the foot and the shadow beneath her as she spins. When you imagine yourself below the dancer she should spin counterclockwise and clockwise if you envision yourself above her. For years, the rotating figure was used to test intelligence and determine which side of the brain was more dominate. And apparently, people with high IQs can see the figure spinning in both directions.

Paul Spencer with Tonic contacted Arthur Shapiro and Niko Troje, a pair of scientists who dissect Kayahara's spinning girl in the forthcoming Oxford Compendium of Visual Illusions, to understand the truth behind this theory. He explains that there is are much more complex reasons behind why we see her spinning in different directions.

The duo explains that this ballerina is deemed a reversible image in the class of optical illusions, meaning, even though she spins, she displays 'similarities to other static illusions' — like the Necker cube. Just like the spinning dancer, the Necker cube can be viewed in two ways: either the lower right panel is in the front or people see it placed in the back. Reversible images like the cube and dancer change at a moment's notice because they can be viewed in more than one way, explained Troje, director for BioMotion Lab at Queens University.

When images aren't clear, your brain takes the initiative to fill in the gaps where information is missing. However, a second video adds small white contour lines in certain areas of the dancer's body, which allows our brain to 'solve the illusion faster', said Shapiro.

This is because your brain is able to gather more information from what is being presented. Shapiro also reveals that you don't have to be a genius to see the dancer switch directins. A second video adds small white contour lines in certain areas of the dancer's body, which allows our brain to 'solve the illusion faster', said Shapiro.

Experts reveal that it isn't about brain hemispheres, but most will see the dancer spin clockwise because we tend to choose point of view from above and have an attentional bias towards the right side of the body. Kokichi Sugihara is famous for building 3D optical illusions that make viewers question the laws of nature, but are then blown away once the structure's true form is revealed.

However, even after the hoax is revealed, viewers still see the same illusion after the structure is back in its mystical position. After studying different shapes, Sugihara realized that our brain will choose the most rectangular configuration when it attempts to decipher features that have different interpretations, reports New Scientists.

He says our brains tend to interpret objects as symmetrical and it is just complete reality that facilitates the deception. The reason our brains are easily fooled is because images do not share its depth, which leaves our brains to fill in the missing pieces. And a study from says that the viewing-from-above factor is only the tip of the iceberg. The paper suggests another reason for our clockwise bias, which is an attentional bias - humans tend to lean towards the right side of the body, researchers explain.

And Shapiro and Troje tell Tonic that the reason most people see the dancer spinning clockwise also has to do with the area of our brain that deals with fear, rage and panic — the subcortical system. Most things that can harm us are more likely to sit on the ground, such as snakes and spiders, explained Troje. So when shown ambiguous visual information, we have tendency to process the image as if they're looking downward.

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Aral Balkan

Spinning Girl Silhouette was an animated illusion that practically propelled our site to success few years ago. It was back in the old days when Digg was still a major player. Anyway, the article still receives certain amount of attention and comments, but I noticed how many still struggle seeing the lady spinning in both directions. As you can recall it is possible to see the silhouette of this young dancer spin in both directions.

A popular e-mail going around features a spinning dancer that has been touted as a test of whether you are right-brained and creative or left-brained and logical. If you see the dancer spinning clockwise, the story goes, you are using more of your right brain, and if you see it moving counterclockwise, you are more of a left-brained person.

Which way is the dancer spinning … clockwise or counter-clockwise? Some people will see her turning counter-clockwise, while others may see her turning clockwise. Why is that? What kind of sorcery is this? We need explanations now!

Right Before Your Eyes: The Science Behind The Famous Spinning Dancer Optical Illusion

By Stacy Liberatore For Dailymail. At first glance, it's a simple video of a dancer spinning. However, in fact it is an optical illusion that some say could actually reveal how smart you are. It plays with the brain's visual perception - some see her spinning clockwise, counterclockwise or even switching between the two. Scroll down for videos. The optical illusion was created by the Japanese Flash designer Nobuyuki Kayahara in and for many years, was used to determine whether people are right-brain creative or left-brain logical dominant. However, recent studies reveal that it does not deal with areas of the brain, but our perspective. Most people see her spinning clockwise because we tend to choose a viewpoint from above rather than below. Another reason for our clockwise bias is an attentional bias that leans towards the right side of the body.

Which way do YOU think the dancer is spinning?

The spinning dancer illusion is an example of a bistable motion illusion. It is possible to see the dancer moving either clockwise or anticlockwise. Often the direction of movement will suddenly switch as you are watching the image. It has been suggested that the direction of perceived movement may depend on which hemisphere of the brain is more active.

If it spins clockwise, you supposedly use more of your right brain.

As a kid, I stacked my bookshelf high with Magic Eye books and littered the pages of my journals with sketches of the Necker cube. As such, it should come as no surprise that I have wasted a fair amount of time today pondering how the "spinning dancer" optical illusion works. Now seems like as good a time as any, right?

Optical Illusion Explained: Which Way Is The Dancer Spinning?

The spinning dancer , also known as the silhouette illusion , is a kinetic , bistable , animated optical illusion originally distributed as a GIF animation showing a silhouette of a pirouetting female dancer. The illusion, created in by Japanese web designer Nobuyuki Kayahara, [1] [2] involves the apparent direction of motion of the figure. Some observers initially see the figure as spinning clockwise viewed from above and some counterclockwise. Additionally, some may see the figure suddenly spin in the opposite direction.

To me, this silhouetted woman looks like she's rotating counterclockwise, but every so often, for a fleeting moment, she reverses her spin. It's maddening, because I know this is all in my head. I run the Youtube theory by them. They're game. We do this all the time, says Shapiro.

The Truth About the Spinning Dancer

In fact, experts argue that the optical illusion can actually reveal how smart an individual is based on the brain's visual perception. The dancer's direction will undoubtedly divide opinion as some people will see her spinning clockwise while others will see her turning anti-clockwise and some will see both. But 13 years since it was released, experts say the illusion isn't about the brain hemisphere but instead reveal most people will see her rotating clockwise. This is because we tend to have a viewpoint from above and an attention bias towards the right side of the body. It was originally created in by the Japanese Flash designer Nobuyuki Kayahara and for many years it did determine which side of the brain people used. According to the video, people who see her spinning clockwise are using their right brain meaning they see the bigger picture, they're philosophical and spiritual, think outside of the box, are imaginative and take risks. However, if you see her spinning anti-clockwise you're logical, detail and fact oriented, mathematical and scientific and strategic, while people who see both are supposedly very intelligent with high IQs. The scientists explain that the ballerina is deemed a reversible image, which means that even though she rotates, she shows "similarities to other static illusions".

Dec 3, - Take a look at this amazing Spinning Girl Illusion Explanation illusion. As you can recall it is possible to see the silhouette of this young dancer to the left of the image you can get it to go from clockwise to counterclockwise.

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Spinning dancer

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Does the “Right Brain vs. Left Brain” Spinning Dancer Test Work?

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Is This Woman Spinning Left or Right?

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