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Male victims of domestic violence europe

Violence against men VAM [ citation needed ] consists of violent acts that are disproportionately or exclusively committed against men. Men are overrepresented as both victims [1] [2] and perpetrators of violence. Studies of social attitudes show violence is perceived as more or less serious depending on the gender of victim and perpetrator. Richard Felson challenges the assumption that violence against women is different from violence against men. The same motives play a role in almost all violence, regardless of gender: to gain control or retribution and to promote or defend self-image. Writing for Time , Cathy Young criticised the feminist movement for not doing enough to challenge double standards in the treatment of male victims of physical abuse and sexual assault.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: 2009: Ray Barry talks about male victims of domestic violence (BBC 'The Big Questions')

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Group wants shelter for men facing domestic violence

Facts and figures: Ending violence against women

Council of Europe Treaty Series - No. Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence. Istanbul, The member States of the Council of Europe and the other signatories hereto,. Taking account of the growing body of case law of the European Court of Human Rights which sets important standards in the field of violence against women;.

Condemning all forms of violence against women and domestic violence;. Recognising that the realisation of de jure and de facto equality between women and men is a key element in the prevention of violence against women;. Recognising that violence against women is a manifestation of historically unequal power relations between women and men, which have led to domination over, and discrimination against, women by men and to the prevention of the full advancement of women;.

Recognising the structural nature of violence against women as gender-based violence, and that violence against women is one of the crucial social mechanisms by which women are forced into a subordinate position compared with men;.

Recognising the ongoing human rights violations during armed conflicts that affect the civilian population, especially women in the form of widespread or systematic rape and sexual violence and the potential for increased gender-based violence both during and after conflicts;. Recognising that women and girls are exposed to a higher risk of gender-based violence than men;. Recognising that domestic violence affects women disproportionately, and that men may also be victims of domestic violence;.

Recognising that children are victims of domestic violence, including as witnesses of violence in the family;. Aspiring to create a Europe free from violence against women and domestic violence,. Have agreed as follows:. Chapter I — Purposes, definitions, equality and non-discrimination, general obligations. Article 1 — Purposes of the Convention. Article 2 — Scope of the Convention. Parties shall pay particular attention to women victims of gender-based violence in implementing the provisions of this Convention.

Article 3 — Definitions. For the purpose of this Convention:. Article 4 — Fundamental rights, equality and non-discrimination. Article 5 — State obligations and due diligence. Article 6 — Gender-sensitive policies.

Parties shall undertake to include a gender perspective in the implementation and evaluation of the impact of the provisions of this Convention and to promote and effectively implement policies of equality between women and men and the empowerment of women.

Chapter II — Integrated policies and data collection. Article 7 — Comprehensive and co-ordinated policies. Article 8 — Financial resources. Parties shall allocate appropriate financial and human resources for the adequate implementation of integrated policies, measures and programmes to prevent and combat all forms of violence covered by the scope of this Convention, including those carried out by non-governmental organisations and civil society.

Article 9 — Non-governmental organisations and civil society. Parties shall recognise, encourage and support, at all levels, the work of relevant non-governmental organisations and of civil society active in combating violence against women and establish effective co-operation with these organisations. Article 10 — Co-ordinating body. These bodies shall co-ordinate the collection of data as referred to in Article 11, analyse and disseminate its results. Article 11 — Data collection and research.

Chapter III — Prevention. Article 12 — General obligations. Article 13 — Awareness-raising. Article 14 — Education. Article 15 — Training of professionals. Article 16 — Preventive intervention and treatment programmes.

Article 17 — Participation of the private sector and the media. Chapter IV — Protection and support. Article 18 — General obligations. Article 19 — Information. Parties shall take the necessary legislative or other measures to ensure that victims receive adequate and timely information on available support services and legal measures in a language they understand.

Article 20 — General support services. These measures should include, when necessary, services such as legal and psychological counselling, financial assistance, housing, education, training and assistance in finding employment. Parties shall promote the provision of sensitive and knowledgeable assistance to victims in presenting any such complaints. Article 22 — Specialist support services. Article 23 — Shelters. Parties shall take the necessary legislative or other measures to provide for the setting-up of appropriate, easily accessible shelters in sufficient numbers to provide safe accommodation for and to reach out pro-actively to victims, especially women and their children.

Article 24 — Telephone helplines. Article 25 — Support for victims of sexual violence. Parties shall take the necessary legislative or other measures to provide for the setting up of appropriate, easily accessible rape crisis or sexual violence referral centres for victims in sufficient numbers to provide for medical and forensic examination, trauma support and counselling for victims.

Article 26 — Protection and support for child witnesses. Article 27 — Reporting. Parties shall take the necessary measures to encourage any person witness to the commission of acts of violence covered by the scope of this Convention or who has reasonable grounds to believe that such an act may be committed, or that further acts of violence are to be expected, to report this to the competent organisations or authorities.

Article 28 — Reporting by professionals. Parties shall take the necessary measures to ensure that the confidentiality rules imposed by internal law on certain professionals do not constitute an obstacle to the possibility, under appropriate conditions, of their reporting to the competent organisations or authorities if they have reasonable grounds to believe that a serious act of violence covered by the scope of this Convention, has been committed and further serious acts of violence are to be expected.

Chapter V — Substantive law. Article 29 — Civil lawsuits and remedies. Article 30 — Compensation. Article 31 — Custody, visitation rights and safety. Article 32 — Civil consequences of forced marriages. Parties shall take the necessary legislative or other measures to ensure that marriages concluded under force may be voidable, annulled or dissolved without undue financial or administrative burden placed on the victim.

Article 33 — Psychological violence. Article 34 — Stalking. Parties shall take the necessary legislative or other measures to ensure that the intentional conduct of repeatedly engaging in threatening conduct directed at another person, causing her or him to fear for her or his safety, is criminalised.

Article 35 — Physical violence. Parties shall take the necessary legislative or other measures to ensure that the intentional conduct of committing acts of physical violence against another person is criminalised.

Article 36 — Sexual violence, including rape. Article 37 — Forced marriage. Article 38 — Female genital mutilation. Parties shall take the necessary legislative or other measures to ensure that the following intentional conducts are criminalised:. Article 39 — Forced abortion and forced sterilisation. Article 40 — Sexual harassment. Parties shall take the necessary legislative or other measures to ensure that any form of unwanted verbal, non-verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature with the purpose or effect of violating the dignity of a person, in particular when creating an intimidating, hostile, degrading, humiliating or offensive environment, is subject to criminal or other legal sanction.

Article 41 — Aiding or abetting and attempt. This covers, in particular, claims that the victim has transgressed cultural, religious, social or traditional norms or customs of appropriate behaviour.

Article 43 — Application of criminal offences. The offences established in accordance with this Convention shall apply irrespective of the nature of the relationship between victim and perpetrator. Article 44 — Jurisdiction. Article 45 — Sanctions and measures.

These sanctions shall include, where appropriate, sentences involving the deprivation of liberty which can give rise to extradition. Article 46 — Aggravating circumstances. Parties shall take the necessary legislative or other measures to ensure that the following circumstances, insofar as they do not already form part of the constituent elements of the offence, may, in conformity with the relevant provisions of internal law, be taken into consideration as aggravating circumstances in the determination of the sentence in relation to the offences established in accordance with this Convention:.

Article 47 — Sentences passed by another Party. Parties shall take the necessary legislative or other measures to provide for the possibility of taking into account final sentences passed by another Party in relation to the offences established in accordance with this Convention when determining the sentence. Article 48 — Prohibition of mandatory alternative dispute resolution processes or sentencing.

Chapter VI — Investigation, prosecution, procedural law and protective measures. Article 49 — General obligations. Article 50 — Immediate response, prevention and protection. Article 51 — Risk assessment and risk management. Article 52 — Emergency barring orders. Parties shall take the necessary legislative or other measures to ensure that the competent authorities are granted the power to order, in situations of immediate danger, a perpetrator of domestic violence to vacate the residence of the victim or person at risk for a sufficient period of time and to prohibit the perpetrator from entering the residence of or contacting the victim or person at risk.

Measures taken pursuant to this article shall give priority to the safety of victims or persons at risk. Article 53 — Restraining or protection orders. Article 54 — Investigations and evidence. Parties shall take the necessary legislative or other measures to ensure that, in any civil or criminal proceedings, evidence relating to the sexual history and conduct of the victim shall be permitted only when it is relevant and necessary.

Hotline for male victims of domestic violence inaugurated in two German states

Sexual and domestic violence SDV presents a serious security threat in all societies and one that security sector institutions such as the police, justice system, armed forces and prisons are increasingly beginning to address. Historically, SDV was thought to almost exclusively affect women, yet recent studies in several countries have indicated that there are also large numbers of male victims. These men often share similar security needs with female victims, but they also experience gender-specific barriers to accessing security and justice caused, in part, by the fact that the issue of SDV against men remains shrouded in silence and misconceptions. With this in mind, this guidance note is designed to serve as a tool to enable security sector institutions to provide a more effective, gender-sensitive approach to preventing and responding to SDV against men. The first half of this publication provides an overview of the characteristics and incidence of SDV committed against men as well as an outline of who the perpetrators and victims are and what impact these forms of violence tend to have on the victim.

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When countries around Europe declared massive large-scale lockdowns on their territories, many citizens were forced to stay at home, being barred from leaving unless they need essentials like food or medicine. This also led to many families or couples being stuck together for a prolonged period of time, without the opportunity to go outside and spend some time alone. It also forced many citizens to stay at home with their abusers whom they have been avoiding but are now unable to do so. Such occurrences have led to a large increase in cases of domestic violence across most European countries and all of them are busy figuring out new ways to tackle the issue.

Publication

Health topics Health determinants Gender Data and statistics. Data and statistics. Gender-based discrimination affects health Survey data from several countries in the Region show that women in all countries are subject to violence by their intimate partners. In the European Region EU , 1 in 5 women have been victims of domestic violence. Traditional practices such as bride kidnapping and honour killings are present in the Region. Female genital mutilation has been documented among migrant communities. There is evidence that boys from different foreign backgrounds who live in western Europe are at a higher risk of injury than boys with a European background.

More than 40% of domestic violence victims are male, report reveals

Council of Europe Treaty Series - No. Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence. Istanbul, The member States of the Council of Europe and the other signatories hereto,.

The simple measure being urged on millions around the world can represent an immediate danger to those already suffering or at risk of domestic abuse.

Please refresh the page and retry. Record numbers of men are reporting domestic abuse by their partners to police - as the proportion of women victims turning to police has fallen, official figures have revealed. The proportion of male victims who told police about their domestic abuse increased from

Violence against men

About two in five of all victims of domestic violence are men, contradicting the widespread impression that it is almost always women who are left battered and bruised, a new report claims. Men assaulted by their partners are often ignored by police, see their attacker go free and have far fewer refuges to flee to than women, says a study by the men's rights campaign group Parity. The charity's analysis of statistics on domestic violence shows the number of men attacked by wives or girlfriends is much higher than thought. In men made up

Every case of domestic abuse should be taken seriously and each individual given access to the support they need. All victims should be able to access appropriate support. Whilst both men and women may experience incidents of inter-personal violence and abuse, women are considerably more likely to experience repeated and severe forms of abuse, including sexual violence. They are also more likely to have experienced sustained physical, psychological or emotional abuse, or violence which results in injury or death. There are important differences between male violence against women and female violence against men, namely the amount, severity and impact. It includes acts that inflict physical, mental or sexual harm or suffering, threats of such acts, coercion and other deprivations of liberty.

Domestic abuse is a gendered crime

Global and regional estimates of violence against women: prevalence and health effects of intimate partner violence and non-partner sexual violence , p. Global Study on Homicide , p. Global Report on Trafficking in Persons 8 , p. Is every child counted? Behind the numbers: ending school violence and bullying , p.

to end gender-based violence. Practices that work from Eastern Europe and Central Asia DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND SERVE SURVIVORS IN ROMANIA.

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