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Male victims of domestic violence in the caribbean

As we near the International day to End Violence Against Women , November 25 th , it is important to recognize how little is actually known about the issue in the Caribbean. The impact of violence on different gender groups men, women, boy and girls is still understudied particularly in contexts — like those of many Caribbean countries — where high levels of urban violence have led to understandable focus on the number of homicides. While they are less frequently victims of lethal violence, women do suffer disproportionately from intimate partner violence and sexual violence and may be repeatedly victimized, or severely traumatized. Special surveys that estimate prevalence have generally not been implemented in the Caribbean. What we do know, is that there is widespread acceptance of traditional gender norms and the use of violence, which are often linked to higher levels of VAW in societies. More

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Apparently men can't be VICTIMS of DOMESTIC VIOLENCE...

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Male Victims of Domestic Abuse

Yes, Caribbean men are dying from violence, but what about women?

Sunday, February 16, Although Jamaican women are well-represented in Government, business, sports and other positions of high social value, many of them still feel physically unsafe. The brutal murders of women in recent times at the hands of their partners have sparked public outcry and alarm.

Femicide — defined as a homicide in which the victim is a woman or a girl — is something the country can and should do more to stop.

Jamaica has the second highest rate of femicides in the world, according to United Nations data from last year. The Jamaica Constabulary Force reports an average murder rate for women as 13 per , females — higher than the 10 murders per , threshold for epidemics established by the World Health Organization.

For regional comparison, in the same murder rate figure was 6. One in four Jamaican women have suffered physical violence at the hands of their partner, according to the Women's Health Survey. In some communities, rates are reportedly as high as 60 per cent. Explanations range from the country's turbulent history to widely held patriarchal views, under which some men see themselves in a position of dominance over 'their woman'.

According to the Jamaica Women's Health Survey, 70 per cent of Jamaicans believe that the man is the head of a household, and that the place of a woman is to do the domestic work and raise children. Increasingly, however, women in Jamaica, as around the world, are becoming more financially and socially independent, which can in turn generate a perceived disruption of traditional roles, and anger or frustration on the part of men.

In the Jamaica Reproductive Health Survey , over 55 per cent of Jamaican men said that a good wife should obey her husband, even if she disagrees. Two out of every five Jamaican men, or 40 per cent, said that it is important for a man to show his wife or partner who is the boss. Incredibly, 24 per cent of respondents either approved a man hitting his wife if she neglected household duties, or disapproved but understood.

The numbers were higher if the wife is unfaithful. In this context, conflict resolution and anger management skills are in short supply, and violence often becomes the default response in a dispute.

Some men often do not express their emotions in a healthy way and there is a view that infidelity on the part of women is unacceptable, whereas for men it is the norm.

Jamaican social norms and views on the dynamics of relationships need to be closely examined and addressed. The continued use of corporal punishment to correct and punish children, especially boys, can result in traumatised, angry and violent children — and violent future adults. All this on top of undiagnosed mental health issues and drug abuse. It is clear that the country needs solutions that are comprehensive and effective in both the short and long terms.

At the Government level, recent advances such as the establishment of a domestic violence call centre by the Bureau of Gender Affairs are heartening but insufficient. The strengthening and full implementation of police protocols to handle domestic violence cases need to be expedited and rolled out nationally. Court personnel should be better trained to effectively identify and assist victims and to provide trauma-informed support for their cases. There also needs to be stricter enforcement of protection and occupation orders made by the court, under the Domestic Violence Act, to provide restraining orders and court orders removing the abuser from the home.

Evidence-based programmes from around the region and the world offer insight and guidance into what might work here. The Partnership for Peace P4P domestic violence diversion programme, which provides counselling and other actions for men brought before court for intimate partner violence, has helped reduce domestic violence in the Caribbean. The action plan to eliminate gender-based violence and the National Plan of Action for an Integrated Response to Children and Violence need to be fully implemented as these plans have been rolled forward for several years.

There needs to be renewed and more extensive and sustained campaigns on conflict resolution, positive values and social norms as well as respect for others. Ending violence against women will also require broader action across Jamaican society.

According to the Women's Health Survey, most survivors of intimate partner violence disclose their experiences to close family members or friends, rather than the police or a social service agency.

Only 32 per cent of those who sought help turned to the police, while 11 per cent turned to the health care system and five per cent resorted to the courts. More can be done to strengthen community-level response and support for intimate partner violence survivors and to provide them with adequate resources to identify and protect loved ones experiencing violence. The multi-agency network of service providers and referral agencies that can support victims needs to be strengthened and stronger awareness campaigns instituted.

We see the recent announcement that the Government plans to review the Domestic Violence Act and the Sexual Harassment Act as steps in the right direction. The IDB has a long trajectory working in the areas of violence prevention, including domestic and gender-based violence.

One of our projects is supporting efforts by the Jamaica Constabulary Force to revise its protocols to deal with domestic violence. You can send us your thoughts and ideas on this topic by writing to IDBJamaica iadb. Gender-based violence is a part of the larger problem of violence facing Jamaica. While we believe that all forms of violence need to be addressed, violence against our more vulnerable citizens — whether they be women, youth, the elderly or disabled — needs to be a priority to move Jamaica towards being a kinder, gentler and safer society where everyone can flourish.

The Bureau of Gender Affairs' hotlines for domestic abuses are: , for women, and , for men. Now you can read the Jamaica Observer ePaper anytime, anywhere. We welcome reader comments on the top stories of the day.

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Discussing Domestic Violence in the Caribbean

Sunday, February 16, Although Jamaican women are well-represented in Government, business, sports and other positions of high social value, many of them still feel physically unsafe. The brutal murders of women in recent times at the hands of their partners have sparked public outcry and alarm. Femicide — defined as a homicide in which the victim is a woman or a girl — is something the country can and should do more to stop. Jamaica has the second highest rate of femicides in the world, according to United Nations data from last year.

According to a study by UN Women Caribbean , violence against women and girls is one of the most common forms of insecurity facing citizens. Violence against women is not only a pervasive human rights challenge, it also carries high personal and social costs that range from effects on physical and mental health, to reduced reproduction and productivity.

Despite laws against domestic violence, many women in Latin America and the Caribbean continue to be failed by the legal system. Rocio Mancilla had an extramarital affair and was killed by her husband last April. To date, nearly 30 countries in the region have enacted laws against domestic violence or have characterized the violence as a crime. Surveys from various countries, however, indicate that an estimated 10 percent to 50 percent of women report being physically assaulted by their male partner. This violence exacts a heavy toll.

Domestic Violence: An Ongoing Threat to Women in Latin America and the Caribbean

Sources indicate that violence against women in Barbados is a "significant" social problem US 24 May , 8 and a "serious social concern" Freedom House During a visit to Barbados in April , the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights stated that although domestic violence and sexual harassment occur throughout the world, they are "particularly serious problems" in Barbados and other Caribbean countries UN 5 Apr. Individuals were surveyed from approximately every third house in all 30 constituencies of Barbados, and interviewed regarding their knowledge of any domestic violence situations, rather than incidents that they experienced personally ibid. The survey, which eliminated 2. Of those 2, cases, 86 percent were cases of violence perpetrated by men against women, 4 percent were by women against men, another 4 percent were adults against children, while the remainder were other types of violence ibid. Of the cases of domestic violence reported by interviewees, the following types of abuse occurred either some or all of the time:. Using police homicide statistics from the years to , the CADRES report indicates that, on average, 21 percent of homicides in Barbados during these years were a result of domestic violence against women ibid. The CADRES survey, which also interviewed representatives of state and non-state agencies about their perspectives on domestic violence, found that the economic situation, alcohol abuse, past abuse in childhood, and the "patriarchal nature of Barbadian society" were factors contributing to domestic violence CADRES [], 16,

Domestic Violence: An Ongoing Threat to Women in Latin America and the Caribbean

Sunday, February 16, Although Jamaican women are well-represented in Government, business, sports and other positions of high social value, many of them still feel physically unsafe. The brutal murders of women in recent times at the hands of their partners have sparked public outcry and alarm. Femicide — defined as a homicide in which the victim is a woman or a girl — is something the country can and should do more to stop.

The tri-island state of Grenada—comprising Grenada, Carriacou and Petite Martinique—is home to a population of just over , residents.

Now some men are arguing that this is unfair as they are also suffering at the hands of women and no one seems to be paying attention. The meeting was held in Barbados. For instance, there were reports that within one year more than Barbadian women had applied for restraining orders against their spouses.

POPULATION-CARIBBEAN: Men Suffering at the Hands of Women

At age 19, he joined the civil society movement working on women, gender and youth issues with a great emphasis on sexual crimes. His activism allowed him to see a need for young people and men to be involved in the movement to end sexual violence and stereotypes of sexual crimes. Kissoon has a background in Social Work allowing him to practice trauma counselling and behaviour change via national policy and community outreach. Some policies that he has worked on at a state level are the National youth policy, National Gender Policy and the Domestic Violence Act, which is now being revised.

Jump to navigation. The fracturing of families and communities by economic restructuring has led to a dramatic increase in domestic violence throughout the Caribbean. What makes matters worse is that domestic violence is often trivialized and left out of context, therefore severely hindering efforts to implement meaningful and lasting reforms. When crime and the Caribbean is uttered in the same sentence, a reference to the drug trade is unfortunately not far behind. While the drug trade is a tragic epidemic in its own right, the fracturing of families and communities by economic restructuring has led to a dramatic increase in domestic violence throughout the region.

The group has just launched a worldwide campaign to fight violence against women. Amnesty said that all over the world, countries are failing to protect women in their homes and quoted a study carried out in 50 countries which concluded that at least one in three women has been beaten, forced into sex or otherwise abused during her life. BBC Caribbean Service spoke to activists in three Caribbean countries about Amnesty's statement who all agreed that more can be done to deal with the issue of violence against women. Underwood said that the organisations set up to assist women are under funded and access for women is limited. She said that in many cases, women are reluctant to make complaints to the police, as they find the police are unwilling to get involved in what is perceived as a 'domestic issue'. In Trinidad and Tobago, the police used to have a similar attitude, however in recent years, the introduction of the Domestic Violence Act has given the police more power to deal with complaints of domestic violence. Clinical psychologist Dr Jillian Ballantyne told BBC Caribbean Service that the police now take the reports much more seriously and investigate claims much more thoroughly. Ballantyne pointed out that in Trinidad, the women who were accessing the shelters were women from the working classes, however, the more educated women from the higher echelons of society were reluctant to report abuse.

Mar 2, - Domestic violence a big Caribbean problem as a crime in only 51 countries. 70% of female murder victims are killed by male partners.

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Comments: 2
  1. Nitilar

    I apologise, but, in my opinion, there is other way of the decision of a question.

  2. Vudokazahn

    Quite right! I think, what is it good idea.

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